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Trojan horse

Trojan horses are impostors. The files claim to be desirable programs, but they are malicious. A very important distinction from true viruses is that they do not replicate themselves, as viruses do. Trojan horses contain a malicious code which, when triggered, causes loss or theft of data. For a Trojan horse to spread, you must invite these programs onto your computer; for example, by opening an email attachment. Trojan horses are also known to create a back door on a computer. The back door gives another user access to a system, and possibly allows confidential or personal information to be compromised. Unlike viruses and worms, Trojan horses neither reproduce by infecting other files, nor do they self-replicate.

A program that claims to be a desirable program but is malicious. A very important distinction from true viruses is that they do not replicate themselves, as viruses do. Trojan horses contain malicious code, which causes loss or theft of data. For a Trojan horse to spread, you must invite these programs onto your computer; for example, by opening an email attachment. Trojan horses are also known to create a backdoor on a computer. The backdoor gives another user access to a system and possibly allows confidential or personal information to be compromised. Unlike viruses and worms, Trojan horses do not reproduce by infecting other files, nor do they self-replicate.